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"Even negotiating your salary just once can reap you more than 0,000 over the course of a lifetime," says Linda Babcock, an economist at Carnegie Mellon. The average credit card balance in 2011 was ,576, according to data from Credit

With an average interest rate of nearly 17%, you'd rack up more than

"Even negotiating your salary just once can reap you more than $500,000 over the course of a lifetime," says Linda Babcock, an economist at Carnegie Mellon. The average credit card balance in 2011 was $6,576, according to data from Credit

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"Even negotiating your salary just once can reap you more than $500,000 over the course of a lifetime," says Linda Babcock, an economist at Carnegie Mellon. The average credit card balance in 2011 was $6,576, according to data from Credit

With an average interest rate of nearly 17%, you'd rack up more than $1,100 in interest every year.

Paying attention to cash flow will make you more mindful of your purchases—and less apt to fork out dollars for yet another pair of shoes. Skipping disability insurance."Your chance of becoming disabled is far greater than your chance of dying before retirement," says Emory, but you have life insurance, right?

Create an account on and use it to track your day-to-day expenditures by category. If you lost your job tomorrow, how long would you be able to last on your savings? Start with disability coverage offered through your employer, if you can—it'll be much cheaper than the individual market, or it may be free.

Consider that one in three adults who've ever combined finances with someone say a partner has financially deceived them, according to a study by the National Endowment for Financial Education and

If you're not checking in regularly, you're vulnerable if your spouse mismanages the family finances—or in a real mess if you get divorced or your spouse dies, since you won't know how to take over.

"I often hear people say, 'I don't live an extravagant lifestyle,' but they spend a large percentage of their disposable income on going out to dinner," says Baltimore financial planner Wendy Weaver.

If you don't know where your money's going, you can't accurately plan to meet saving and spending goals. You should have enough socked away (in a money market account, perhaps) to cover three to six months of living expenses—which should be less than three to six months of income, since income includes retirement contributions, taxes and money for unnecessary spending.

,100 in interest every year.

Paying attention to cash flow will make you more mindful of your purchases—and less apt to fork out dollars for yet another pair of shoes. Skipping disability insurance."Your chance of becoming disabled is far greater than your chance of dying before retirement," says Emory, but you have life insurance, right?

Create an account on and use it to track your day-to-day expenditures by category. If you lost your job tomorrow, how long would you be able to last on your savings? Start with disability coverage offered through your employer, if you can—it'll be much cheaper than the individual market, or it may be free.

Consider that one in three adults who've ever combined finances with someone say a partner has financially deceived them, according to a study by the National Endowment for Financial Education and

If you're not checking in regularly, you're vulnerable if your spouse mismanages the family finances—or in a real mess if you get divorced or your spouse dies, since you won't know how to take over.

"I often hear people say, 'I don't live an extravagant lifestyle,' but they spend a large percentage of their disposable income on going out to dinner," says Baltimore financial planner Wendy Weaver.

If you don't know where your money's going, you can't accurately plan to meet saving and spending goals. You should have enough socked away (in a money market account, perhaps) to cover three to six months of living expenses—which should be less than three to six months of income, since income includes retirement contributions, taxes and money for unnecessary spending.

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Using a bunch of cards also may hurt your credit score.If you can't get a policy that way, check with professional associations you belong to, or consider getting a policy that replaces less of your earnings should you become unable to work."Some income would be better than no income," says Weaver. Yes, it's great that you're putting money aside for your child's higher education.Once that happens, take the money you were throwing at that card and put it toward the next-highest balance, and so on until everything's paid off. When you spread your purchases out over multiple cards, it's tough to rein in spending."It's harder to be aware of where your money is going," says Emory.

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